The Unspoken Question Your Content Must Always Answer 

The Unspoken Question Your Content Must Always Answer 

The unspoken question you must always answer is “What’s in it for me?” How will I, your audience/customer benefit from what you are offering?

From naming your website, blog, or YouTube video channel (your platform) to creating content, always ask yourself whether your audience or customer can understand the benefits you are promising.

The unspoken question you must always answer is “What’s in it for me?” How will I, your audience/customer benefit from what you are offering?

From naming your website, blog, or YouTube video channel (your platform) to creating content, always ask yourself whether your audience or customer can understand the benefits you are promising.

Naming Your Platform

Decide which media platform you’re going to use to deliver your content.  Whether you choose a website, blog, or YouTube channel, the name of your content platform should tell your audience what you’re offering.

Example:

Aunt Millie’s Place 

This name does not answer the question, what’s in it for me.

Aunt Millie’s Fish Place 

The name is better, but still vague. What kind of fish is she selling? Is she selling fish for aquariums or is it a seafood restaurant? 

Aunt Millie’s Koi Fish and Pond Design

Enough said. This name tells us that Aunt Millie sells koi fish and designs koi ponds. There’s enough information for anyone looking for koi fish supplies to assume Aunt Millie may also sell supplies. 

 The Opening

The promise of what’s in it for me should be the first thing you addressed. In those first few seconds, your audience/customer should know what they’ll gain by reading or listening further. 

 The Middle & The End

Every piece of content that benefits your audience builds audience loyalty. 

After capturing their attention in the first few lines make sure you continue engaging with your audience and delivering value.  

Every article, blog post and video have the potential to solve a problem, by answering the question what’s in it for me. Your content also has the power to give your audience a heads up about problems they didn’t know they should be aware of. 

Let’s look at a scenario:

You own a local koi fish farm.  It’s the middle of the summer and you’ve just made a sale to a new customer. She didn’t have time for you to give her some tips, so you give her the title of an article she can find on your website instead. She goes to your website and reads the article you suggested and one that piqued her interest. She read:

The Basics of Maintaining Your Koi Fish and Koi Pond.      

And

How to Keep Flesh Eating Bacteria from Killing Your Koi This Winter.

The first article answers the what’s in it for me question by solving a current problem. She has koi fish and she doesn’t know how to take care of them.

The second article answers the question what’s in it for me, by telling her how to avoid a problem. It’s not winter, her new fish are healthy, but the headline is telling her there’s a future threat that she knew nothing about and there’s a way to avoid it. 

Naming Your Platform

Decide which media platform you’re going to use to deliver your content.  Whether you choose a website, blog, or YouTube channel, the name of your content platform should tell your audience what you’re offering.

Example:

Aunt Millie’s Place 

This name does not answer the question, what’s in it for me.

Aunt Millie’s Fish Place 

The name is better, but still vague. What kind of fish is she selling? Is she selling fish for aquariums or is it a seafood restaurant? 

Aunt Millie’s Koi Fish and Pond Design

Enough said. This name tells us that Aunt Millie sells koi fish and designs koi ponds. There’s enough information for anyone looking for koi fish supplies to assume Aunt Millie may also sell supplies. 

 The Opening

The promise of what’s in it for me should be the first thing you addressed. In those first few seconds, your audience/customer should know what they’ll gain by reading or listening further. 

 The Middle & The End

Every piece of content that benefits your audience builds audience loyalty. 

After capturing their attention in the first few lines make sure you continue engaging with your audience and delivering value.  

Every article, blog post and video have the potential to solve a problem, by answering the question what’s in it for me. Your content also has the power to give your audience a heads up about problems they didn’t know they should be aware of. 

Let’s look at a scenario:

You own a local koi fish farm.  It’s the middle of the summer and you’ve just made a sale to a new customer. She didn’t have time for you to give her some tips, so you give her the title of an article she can find on your website instead. She goes to your website and reads the article you suggested and one that piqued her interest. She read:

The Basics of Maintaining Your Koi Fish and Koi Pond.      

And

How to Keep Flesh Eating Bacteria from Killing Your Koi This Winter.

The first article answers the what’s in it for me question by solving a current problem. She has koi fish and she doesn’t know how to take care of them.

The second article answers the question what’s in it for me, by telling her how to avoid a problem. It’s not winter, her new fish are healthy, but the headline is telling her there’s a future threat that she knew nothing about and there’s a way to avoid it. 

THE IMAGES

Sometimes an interesting image will catch people’s attention, before they even read your content.

You can use this to your advantage by punctuating your message with a good image.

 

Aunt Millie’s Koi Fish and Pond Design website has this image included in the first section of an article.            

THE IMAGES

Sometimes an interesting image will catch people’s attention, before they even read your content.

You can use this to your advantage by punctuating your message with a good image.

 

Aunt Millie’s Koi Fish and Pond Design website has this image included in the first section of an article.            

June 9, 2020 | Robert Hudson

June 9, 2020 | Robert Hudson

© 2020 granitewallet.com  All Rights Reserved

© 2020 granitewallet.com  All Rights Reserved

This image is not super exciting, but since most of us are used to seeing images that look down into a koi fish pond, seeing a koi fish from this angle, seemingly suspended in thin air,  might be enough to make someone stop to figure out what they’re looking at. 

And then there’s this image. 

This image is not super exciting, but since most of us are used to seeing images that look down into a koi fish pond, seeing a koi fish from this angle, seemingly suspended in thin air,  might be enough to make someone stop to figure out what they’re looking at. 

And then there’s this image. 

Doesn’t the fish in the middle look like it has a human-like face? It might cause someone to take a closer look, which might prompt a look at your headline as well.

You can find thousands of free images for commercial use on Unsplash and Pexels:

https://unsplash.com/

https://pexels.com/

Doesn’t the fish in the middle look like it has a human-like face? It might cause someone to take a closer look, which might prompt a look at your headline as well.

You can find thousands of free images for commercial use on Unsplash and Pexels:

https://unsplash.com/

https://pexels.com/

There is a lot of content online and offline vying for your audience’s attention. By combining the elements above, you can provide valuable content, which answers “What’s in it for me?” and helps build your authority in your niche (business category). In this way, you’ll be creating repeat visitors, who become repeat customers that increase your sales. 

There is a lot of content online and offline vying for your audience’s attention. By combining the elements above, you can provide valuable content, which answers “What’s in it for me?” and helps build your authority in your niche (business category). In this way, you’ll be creating repeat visitors, who become repeat customers that increase your sales. 

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